Nous sommes actuellement le 19 Septembre 2018, 08:49

Le fuseau horaire est réglé sur UTC+1 heure




Publier un nouveau sujet Répondre au sujet  [ 11 messages ]  Atteindre la page 1, 2  Suivant
Auteur Message
MessagePublié: 06 Mars 2018, 18:19 
Rédacteur
Rédacteur
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Hors-ligne

Inscription: 27 Mai 2015, 01:37
Messages: 24
Bonjour tout le monde,

J'ai trouvé cet article assez drôle (un peu dans l'esprit de Nioutaik) sur l'emballement un peu rapide de certains américains pour les cultures étrangères. Bien sûr c'est assez exagéré et américano-centré mais intéressant, qu'en pensez vous? :)

(En français ici pour les pas trop anglophones)

Citer:

In the good old days, white colonial powers went to poor foreign countries asking themselves, "What do these people have for us to steal?"

Image

Nowadays, enlightened white people go to poor foreign countries and ask, "What do these noble people have to teach us?" The results are less murderous but more annoying.

Image

Don't get me wrong, it is great that Westerners are now trying to understand foreign cultures and not murder them, but a lot of what's going around these days is less an attempt to understand foreigners as other human beings and more about trying to mine them for whatever mystical foreigner powers they possess. So try to avoid...

5. Believing In Superstitions Just Because They Are Foreign

Image
Everyone knows superstitions are dumb, like throwing salt over your shoulder if you spill some, never opening an umbrella indoors or wearing a helmet while riding a motorcycle. If you tried to start a business teaching people how to hang horseshoes over their doors and avoid black cats, you would be on welfare pretty soon.

Image
See, I tried this and nothing happened.


But bring the superstition from a foreign culture, and suddenly you are in business. You can apparently still convince a shockingly large portion of the population that you can see the future if you're doing it with Tarot cards. They come from the gypsies after all. Of course, these same people would slap you if you offered to tell their fortune from a standard card deck.

Image
"Okay, so I guess three guys are going to ... beat you to death with a club?"

Wear a turban and call yourself Madame Zarisha, and a client will get a chill up their spine when you tell them they are going to die. If you took off the turban and admitted your name is Nancy, you'd get hit with a restraining order.

Image
Applying the transitive property to the movie Drag Me to Hell, this Sikh cabdriver knows how you're going to die.

But now in this global era, Americans are increasingly lumpimg gypsies in with Europeans, and Europeans aren't exotic. People who really want to believe in stupid superstitions have to look to places like China, which has feng shui (sounds more like "phone shway" than "fang shooey"). Feng shui is a really really complex bunch of rules for organizing your house or business or sex dungeon or whatever.

Image
Step 1: Build your house in the shape of an octagon.

Some of those rules are practical but blindingly obvious, like, "Put some thought into your house and don't fling your crap all over the place," and, "Don't block your door," but most are about how facing your front door east or painting it certain colors will increase the flow of "chi". Or if your house is getting too much "chi," you can put a mirror outside to reflect it away. Really.

Image
Apparently chi works like lasers.

Despite being pretty stupid, feng shui got particularly hot in the 90's, with Donald Trump, Oprah, and firms like Salomon Smith Barney hiring feng shui consultants to maximize their chi. Of course, this is the equivalent of a Chinese Executive pinning 4-leaf clovers all over his office.

4.Blindly Trusting Foreign Medicines

Image

Hypothetical question. Suppose that someone handed you a jar of moldy tea and told you to drink it. How fast would you run away?

Image

What if instead of asking you to have some moldy tea, they said it was "kombucha," an ancient Chinese remedy that could cure cancer and cleanse you of toxins? If you are one of millions of American health food nuts, apparently you will chug it, nevermind that it probably doesn't come from China and it's given people food poisoning.

Image
It's actually from Russia, which is well known for its healthy products.


Likewise, because you just can't trust boring American doctors, but can trust rainforest fruits that Amazon tribesmen have been eating for centuries, you have the latest craze: acai.

Image
Before acai, this woman was an overweight man.

Although most research seems to indicate that acai is about as healthy as non-exotic berries, Oprah and health fad opportunists are jumping all over it because Brazil. Tribesmen.

Image
If this guy isn't a health authority, I don't know who is.

Imaginations ran wild and soon it was marketed for weight-loss, and anti-aging, and penis enlargement, because why not. This would be a harmless, stupid fad, if it hadn't driven acai to 60 times its normal price so that those traditional Brazilians can barely afford their own staple food anymore.

Another thing people are (literally) swallowing wholesale is hoodia, a plant product that the San (or Bushmen) of the Kalahari use to suppress hunger on long trips and Americans use to try and stop being fat.

Image
"The Americans need it for WHAT?"

Tell American customers it's "natural" and chewed by a tribe that talks in clicks, and people are so completely hooked they won't even bother to pay attention to quality of the hoodia pills you hand them, many of which are apparently just made from whatever random crap the manufacturer could find lying around the factory.

Image
Honestly, I suspect they're just grinding up things confiscated by the TSA at airports.


But peddle the same customers an American weight loss pill and they'll start clucking about their distrust of "drugs" and "Western medicine."

Anyway, if you really want to put your faith in ancient exotic medicine, you know what ancient Chinese emperors actually did drink for longevity? Mercury! Try that!

3.Treating Foreigners as Having Unearthly Wisdom

Image

The recent movie Eat, Pray, Love was about a lady that lost her passion for life or something, and went on some vacations all over the world until she found it again. It's based on a real story which hopefully is not that stupid and oversimplified, but some of its audience will definitely be people who believe meditating with a random nonwhite person in a foreign country will solve all your spiritual ills.

Image

As Salon.com's Sandip Roy puts it, "I couldn't help wondering, where do those people in Indonesia and India go away to when they lose their passion, spark and faith? I don't think they come to Manhattan. I wonder if there could be an exchange program for the passion-deprived, a sort of global spark-swap." Imagine it ...

Image
"So it turns out I had to go to Fargo to really discover what was wrong inside."


At first glance, this might look similar to people who go volunteering overseas with the Peace Corps or a church or whatever, and come back gushing about how much they learned, but there's a not-so-subtle difference between learning what life is like for other people in the world by actually working with them, and acting like those people were placed there like stations in a bird watching obstacle course designed to restore your Western pluck.

If it actually sounds appealing to have your spiritual enlightenment mapped out for you, you can book a number of different meditation tours to Thailand or Peru (or for the budget conscious, the "there are lots of non-white people there so it's sort of exotic, right?" Arizona tour).

Image
Sedona, Arizona: The hippies' retirement home.

What it's hard for some people to grasp is that in any culture, there are wise people and stupid people, positive lessons and negative lessons, tacos and Montezuma's revenge.

Image
...or Captain Kirk and Celine Dion.

Some random tai chi instructor might really be a Mr. Miyagi type who has a lot to teach you about how to not let your possessions possess you, or he might have flunked tai chi instructor training and moved to Kansas City, where people wouldn't ask to check his license. Chinese culture has a lot to teach us about respecting the elderly, but could learn a lot from America about how to not turn gift-giving into a grueling test of character.

If picking and choosing sounds too complicated, there's an ancient Chinese proverb my grandmother passed down to me that should do the trick: Don't believe someone has something deep to say just because they have a funny accent.

Image

2. Acting Like Foreign Text Has Mystical Power and Beauty

Image
You know how it's been trendy for a while for white Americans to get Chinese or Japanese characters -- sorry, "Hanzi" or "Kanji" -- as tattoos? The idea seems to be that if you get the English words "STRONG" or "BEAUTIFUL" tattooed on your arm, you look like a bragging retard, but if you get it in Japanese, it is suddenly meaningful.

Image
Chinese words are deep.

By no means am I discouraging wannabe exotic kids from continuing this practice, because it leads to hilarity like a man proudly showing off a tattoo he thinks says "spirit" but actually says "gas". Or a guy thinking he's wearing his daughter's name in Chinese when it actually says "woman healthy flow".

Image
This was supposed to be "beautiful" but it's actually "disaster". Kind of recursively appropriate.

Some people might protest that they don't get Asian characters JUST because it's foreign, but because the characters are artistic and beautiful, unlike plain old English. Well, some Chinese teens think differently, getting exotic English tattoos that say things like "PrayGod" or tattoos in Greek they don't understand. As one girl says: "I think it says, 'I'll love you forever.' I didn't have any particular reason. I just liked the way the Greek letters looked." Sub "Japanese" for "Greek" and that exact statement is being uttered somewhere right now on an American college campus.

Image
You still can't beat a homegrown stupid English tattoo though.

Ascribing deep meaning to Asian characters where none exists isn't confined to teens and hipsters. For years, motivational speakers and the like have been touting how the Chinese word for "crisis" is made of "danger" and "opportunity," which (1) is bullshit and (2) is a little insulting as it implies Chinese words were created to teach lessons, unlike any other culture where words are created because you need to say that thing.

Image
"All right, guys, we're working on 'crisis' today. Let's come up with something that will really impress white people in the future."

What would you think if you saw a Chinese motivational speaker teaching his audience that female family members cannot be relied upon to keep their heads in a crisis because the English word for crisis is made of "cry" and "sis"? You laugh, but considering there's 1.3 billion Chinese, someone's probably doing it.

Image
"So when crisis comes, LOCK THEM IN THE BASEMENT."

1. Making Yourself Look Wise and Exotic Via Cultural Name-Dropping

Image

Finally we have the people who remind you at every opportunity that they have traveled to foreign countries, or have read things about foreign countries, or are very much aware that foreign countries exist.

Image
"Oh, I see you've noticed our Tibetan prayer flags."

See if any of these phrases seem familiar:

"It's just starting to get popular here, but everybody was playing it in Japan when I was there."

"You know, the Balinese have a saying..."

"I once had an authentic version of this dish in a street market in Hong Kong."

"That is just terrible about the Chilean miners. I talked to my friend from Peru, which is near Chile, and he thinks it's very sad."

Sure, someone saying one or two of these things occasionally wouldn't be too terrible, but if this is actually a pattern in your life, that's when you need to learn to find new friends. If you find yourself saying it, you should learn a lesson from the Trappist monks I encountered when visiting La Trappe Abbey when I was in France: Shut up.

Image
And then make up for it by making me some beer like they did.


Source: http://www.cracked.com/article_18821_5-examples-americans-thinking-foreign-people-are-magic.html

_________________
Ceci est une signature qui fait réfléchir, dans une langue étrangère pour lui donner un côté mystérieux et spirituel.


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
MessagePublié: 06 Mars 2018, 19:56 
Ni gros, ni moustachu
Ni gros, ni moustachu
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Hors-ligne

Inscription: 24 Avril 2014, 08:31
Messages: 1132
Localisation: Juste derrière vous. Ne vous retournez pas.
Héhé, pas mal.
Merci pour la traduction française, au fait !

_________________
« C'est une paralysie du sommeil. Ou bien un orbe. » (vieille sagesse zététique).


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
MessagePublié: 07 Mars 2018, 19:19 
Membre
Membre
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Hors-ligne

Inscription: 21 Octobre 2011, 14:19
Messages: 951
Maintenant, plus qu'à faire ce genre d'articles pour l'utilisation de l'urinothérapie par la médecine ayurvédique (je n'ai toujours pas surmonté le traumatisme du documentaire d'Arte d'il y a 2 semaines...)


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
MessagePublié: 08 Mars 2018, 21:44 
Sonne toujours deux fois
Sonne toujours deux fois
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Hors-ligne

Inscription: 05 Août 2008, 17:27
Messages: 5482
Localisation: Massif central. Par là.
GreenMeat a écrit:
J'ai trouvé cet article assez drôle (un peu dans l'esprit de Nioutaik) sur l'emballement un peu rapide de certains américains pour les cultures étrangères. Bien sûr c'est assez exagéré et américano-centré mais intéressant, qu'en pensez vous? :)


Ce n'est pas du tout un travers américano-centré, on le retrouve aussi de ce côté de l'Atlantique. Il suffit de voir le peu de recul que beaucoup de nos contemporains ont vis-à-vis des spiritualités asiatiques comme le bouddhisme et l'hindouisme (même si ce dernier est un peu connoté "secte" en dehors du milieu New-Age : il y a eu beaucoup trop d'histoires malheureuses de gourous autoproclamés venus apporter l'illumination en Occident dans les années 60 et 70). Ou vis-à-vis des arts martiaux : un boxeur qui prétend pouvoir coucher un adversaire situé à plusieurs mètres de lui sans le toucher, juste par le pouvoir d'une force mystique, ça fait rire ; par contre quand il s'agit d'un moine shaolin, personne ne cille.

Notez que ça ne marche pas qu'avec l'Asie, mais avec toutes les cultures considérées comme exotiques : tout le monde applaudit le fait qu'en Islande, des autoroutes soient déviées parce que tel devin a dit que le trajet allait détruire un repère d'elfes. Transposez ça à la France, pour voir (« Alors, votre centre commercial-là, ça va pas être possible parce que la vouivre vit à cet endroit-là ») : c'est ridicule.

Citer:
Anyway, if you really want to put your faith in ancient exotic medicine, you know what ancient Chinese emperors actually did drink for longevity? Mercury! Try that!

En fait, il s'agissait de cinabre (sulfure de mercure). Le premier empereur de Chine, Qin Shi Huang, est probablement décédé d'un empoisonnement au cinabre, car il en consommait régulièrement pour prolonger son existence.


En ce qui concerne les tatouages de caractères asiatiques qui ne veulent rien dire, le blog Hanzi Smatter s'en est fait une spécialité. D'ailleurs, la plupart des images de tatouages chinois ratés viennent de ce site.

Cid Picador a écrit:
Maintenant, plus qu'à faire ce genre d'articles pour l'utilisation de l'urinothérapie par la médecine ayurvédique (je n'ai toujours pas surmonté le traumatisme du documentaire d'Arte d'il y a 2 semaines...)

Arte est capable du meilleur comme du pire. C'était un documentaire dithyrambique ou qui arrivait à rester neutre vis à vis de son sujet ?

_________________
There is a curse.
It says :
« May you live in interesting Times. »


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
MessagePublié: 08 Mars 2018, 23:32 
Lueur dans la nuit
Lueur dans la nuit
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Hors-ligne

Inscription: 13 Août 2008, 12:14
Messages: 3439
Citer:
Notez que ça ne marche pas qu'avec l'Asie, mais avec toutes les cultures considérées comme exotiques : tout le monde applaudit le fait qu'en Islande, des autoroutes soient déviées parce que tel devin a dit que le trajet allait détruire un repère d'elfes. Transposez ça à la France, pour voir (« Alors, votre centre commercial-là, ça va pas être possible parce que la vouivre vit à cet endroit-là ») : c'est ridicule.


Moi je ne trouverais pas ça ridicule en fait.... déjà parce qu'une autoroute ou un centre commercial, franchement on a bien assez et puis c'est moche, et j'aime bien l'idée que le monde ne tourne pas seulement sur des principes matérialistes et de "rapport économique" à l'existence... :think:

D'ailleurs, je en crois pas que tout le monde applaudisse l'Islande pour cet aspect de sa culture en fait... pour ce que j'ai déjà entendu ici ou là, c'était un regard mi-amusé (ils sont bien gentils) mi-méprisant (faut vraiment être crétin...). :eh:

_________________
Souvent dans l'être obscur habite un dieu caché
Et comme un œil naissant couvert par ses paupières
Un pur esprit s'accroît sous l'écorce des pierres.

Vers dorés, Gérard de Nerval


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
MessagePublié: 09 Mars 2018, 18:00 
Membre
Membre
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Hors-ligne

Inscription: 21 Octobre 2011, 14:19
Messages: 951
Ar Soner a écrit:
Cid Picador a écrit:
Maintenant, plus qu'à faire ce genre d'articles pour l'utilisation de l'urinothérapie par la médecine ayurvédique (je n'ai toujours pas surmonté le traumatisme du documentaire d'Arte d'il y a 2 semaines...)

Arte est capable du meilleur comme du pire. C'était un documentaire dithyrambique ou qui arrivait à rester neutre vis à vis de son sujet ?


Honnêtement, j'ai changé de chaîne au moment de voir 5 ou 6 personnes boire un verre de leurs urines respectives, je ne suis pas resté pour voir ce qu'en disait le narrateur.
Déjà, j'étais consterné par l'histoire des oeufs cuits dans l'urine de petits garçons recueillies dans les latrines des écoles de je-ne-sais-plus quelle ville chinoise, je n'ai pas réussi à aller plus loin !

Bon, par souci d'honnêteté intellectuelle, je regarderai le documentaire en ligne pour voir s'il y avait un contre-argumentaire aux urinothérapistes...

Sinon, en ce qui concerne la construction de supermarchés ou de parkings sur les anciens cimtières indiens de Palavas-les-Flots ou de Parthenay, avant d'invoquer la présence de la Vouivre, des elfes ou de la Lavandière de l'Enfer...
Les Français devraient déjà respecter leur patrimoine archéologique : en tant que Marseillais et ancien étudiant en histoire, le coup du site de la Corderie, ça passe mal (entre autres saloperies commises du même acabit commises dans la région...)


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
MessagePublié: 09 Mars 2018, 19:51 
Sonne toujours deux fois
Sonne toujours deux fois
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Hors-ligne

Inscription: 05 Août 2008, 17:27
Messages: 5482
Localisation: Massif central. Par là.
Chimère a écrit:
Moi je ne trouverais pas ça ridicule en fait.... déjà parce qu'une autoroute ou un centre commercial, franchement on a bien assez et puis c'est moche, et j'aime bien l'idée que le monde ne tourne pas seulement sur des principes matérialistes et de "rapport économique" à l'existence... :think:

Tu me connais assez pour savoir que je ne suis pas du tout un adepte des supermarchés, autoroutes et parkings. :P
Mais je pense qu'on peut les refuser pour des raisons rationnelles : parce qu'ils ont un impact environnemental négatif, sont superflus en regard des bénéfices socio-économiques qu'ils apportent, parce qu'on en a déjà bien assez partout...

Vouloir justifier ce refus par des arguments irrationnels me semble potentiellement très dangereux : n'importe quel zozo peut débarquer et affirmer que « votre projet dérange le [insérer ici une random créature folklorique invisible] qui habite en ce lieu, vous allez devoir l'arrêter ». C'est absolument invérifiable : aucun juge ne pourra trancher.
Que la justice ou les pouvoirs publics acceptent de prendre en compte le surnaturel, donc par essence quelque chose de complètement spéculatif et non démontré, c'est potentiellement la porte ouverte à toutes les dérives.

Parce que dans le cas islandais, on parle de supermarchés ou d'autoroute, donc des gros projets destructeurs et par super sexys... mais on pourrait imaginer d'autres cas de figure beaucoup moins sympathiques. Imaginez que vous voulez agrandir votre maison en y ajoutant une véranda ; que vous voulez bâtir un centre d'accueil pour migrants ; ou créer un petit potager bio pour alimenter la cantine locale... et que la mafia locale (ou juste un voisin malveillant) débarque en invoquant un argument surnaturel pour stopper nets vos projets.
Vous faites comment pour prouver que vous êtes dans votre bon droit, sachant qu'il n'y a aucun moyen de démontrer que le [random créature folklorique invisible] n'a pas élu domicile sur votre terrain ? La réponse est simple : vous avez perdu d'avance. Votre projet tombe à l'eau, ou vous êtes bons pour verser un subside à votre mafia locale.

_________________
There is a curse.
It says :
« May you live in interesting Times. »


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
MessagePublié: 10 Mars 2018, 12:38 
Rédacteur
Rédacteur
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Hors-ligne

Inscription: 27 Mai 2015, 01:37
Messages: 24
Citer:
Merci pour la traduction française, au fait !


De rien ;)

Citer:
Ce n'est pas du tout un travers américano-centré, on le retrouve aussi de ce côté de l'Atlantique.


Je parlais de la dimension raciale de l'article, le white/non-white constant sur lequel on appuierait beaucoup moins chez nous.

Tu as raison de préciser que c'est valable dans toutes les cultures qui nous paraissent exotiques, par exemple ce blog qui fait le même constat qu' Hanzi Smatter pour l'hébreu.

Pour le projet de supermarché/parking bloqué pour causes de [insérer créature de folklore], je ne sais pas si ça serait recevable en droit français :think:

Citer:
Les Français devraient déjà respecter leur patrimoine archéologique : en tant que Marseillais et ancien étudiant en histoire, le coup du site de la Corderie, ça passe mal (entre autres saloperies commises du même acabit commises dans la région...)


La pression immobilière malheureusement... c'est déjà un progrès qu'il y ai les fouilles préventives.

_________________
Ceci est une signature qui fait réfléchir, dans une langue étrangère pour lui donner un côté mystérieux et spirituel.


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
MessagePublié: 11 Mars 2018, 00:30 
Lueur dans la nuit
Lueur dans la nuit
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Hors-ligne

Inscription: 13 Août 2008, 12:14
Messages: 3439
Citer:
Vous faites comment pour prouver que vous êtes dans votre bon droit, sachant qu'il n'y a aucun moyen de démontrer que le [random créature folklorique invisible] n'a pas élu domicile sur votre terrain ? La réponse est simple : vous avez perdu d'avance. Votre projet tombe à l'eau, ou vous êtes bons pour verser un subside à votre mafia locale.


Ah je n'ai pas dit que ça ne posait aucun problème... j'ai dit que c'était une approche de l'existence poétique et finalement "belle", parce qu'elle sortait justement du cadre... rationaliste dans lequel baigne nos mornes existences...

Cela dit, pour te répondre ben j'ai envie de dire qu'il suffit de trouver un sorcier/exorciste/chaman/druide/rayer la mention inutile pour aller proposer à la dite créature d'aller déposer ses surnaturelles valises ailleurs, par exemple... :think:

:mrgreen:

_________________
Souvent dans l'être obscur habite un dieu caché
Et comme un œil naissant couvert par ses paupières
Un pur esprit s'accroît sous l'écorce des pierres.

Vers dorés, Gérard de Nerval


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
MessagePublié: 11 Mars 2018, 10:50 
Sonne toujours deux fois
Sonne toujours deux fois
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Hors-ligne

Inscription: 05 Août 2008, 17:27
Messages: 5482
Localisation: Massif central. Par là.
Chimère a écrit:
Cela dit, pour te répondre ben j'ai envie de dire qu'il suffit de trouver un sorcier/exorciste/chaman/druide/rayer la mention inutile pour aller proposer à la dite créature d'aller déposer ses surnaturelles valises ailleurs, par exemple... :think:

Je préfère si possible ne pas avoir à payer un chaman/géobiologue/devin autoproclamé en échange d'un service proprement non existant.
Je n'aime pas trop l'idée de balancer l'argent par les fenêtres, mais bon, chacun son truc... :mrgreen:

_________________
There is a curse.
It says :
« May you live in interesting Times. »


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
Afficher les messages publiés depuis:  Trier par  
Publier un nouveau sujet Répondre au sujet  [ 11 messages ]  Atteindre la page 1, 2  Suivant

Le fuseau horaire est réglé sur UTC+1 heure


Qui est en ligne ?

Utilisateurs parcourant ce forum : Aucun utilisateur inscrit et 1 invité


Vous ne pouvez pas publier de nouveaux sujets dans ce forum
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Vous ne pouvez pas éditer vos messages dans ce forum
Vous ne pouvez pas supprimer vos messages dans ce forum
Vous ne pouvez pas transférer de pièces jointes dans ce forum

Rechercher:
Atteindre:  
Développé par phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
Traduction française officielle © Maël Soucaze